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Pharmacy

 

A serious medication error
Right 4 ~ appropriate standards ~ Pharmacy
A consumer phoned the advocacy service seeking support for a complaint regarding a pharmacist who had provided incorrect medication. After hearing the consumer's concerns the advocate provided information on the Code, the role of an advocate and HDC. The consumer wanted an apology and for processes to be improved so this would not happen to anyone else.
The consumer had already made contact with the pharmacist. He had written a letter and was still waiting for response. The advocate provided the timeframes set out in Right 10 and the consumer agreed to contact the advocate if a response had not been received within the stated timeframe. 
The consumer advised that he was satisfied that the pharmacist had taken the complaint seriously and had made changes to the process. He said the pharmacist had also apologised and paid remuneration for petrol expenses and GP appointments. 
The advocate and consumer discussed whether the consumer's outcome had been met and the consumer was very clear that due to the seriousness of the error that he wanted to ensure that the improvements had been put in place and were working. The advocate again reminded the consumer of his right to take the matter to HDC if he wished. 
We discussed the actions the pharmacist had taken. We also planned to ask the provider to meet at a later time to ensure the changes had taken place and were working. The consumer felt this was the best option and so the advocate wrote to the pharmacist advising the complaint was closed.  However the consumer with his advocate would like to meet in a few months time to discuss the improvements made.
Follow up  action on the resolution agreement:
Three months later the advocate accompanied the consumer to a meeting with the provider to discuss the changes. The provider provided copies of policies that had been changed. He also provided a personal apology and thanked the consumer for the feedback. The pharmacist advised that the matter had been taken to the Pharmacy Council for review.
The provider was also able to provide assurance to the consumer that his concerns were treated seriously and that the changes had certainly improved services.  It also highlighted staff performance issues that they were not previously aware of.
The consumer was satisfied following this meeting that his plan to  improve services and make changes to prevent the same thing from happening to anyone else had been achieved.

A serious medication error

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A serious medication error

Right 4 ~ appropriate standards ~ Pharmacy

A consumer phoned the advocacy service seeking support for a complaint regarding a pharmacist who had provided incorrect medication. After hearing the consumer's concerns the advocate provided information on the Code, the role of an advocate and HDC. The consumer wanted an apology and for processes to be improved so this would not happen to anyone else.

The consumer had already made contact with the pharmacist. He had written a letter and was still waiting for response. The advocate provided the timeframes set out in Right 10 and the consumer agreed to contact the advocate if a response had not been received within the stated timeframe. 

The consumer advised that he was satisfied that the pharmacist had taken the complaint seriously and had made changes to the process. He said the pharmacist had also apologised and paid remuneration for petrol expenses and GP appointments. 

The advocate and consumer discussed whether the consumer's outcome had been met and the consumer was very clear that due to the seriousness of the error that he wanted to ensure that the improvements had been put in place and were working. The advocate again reminded the consumer of his right to take the matter to HDC if he wished. 

We discussed the actions the pharmacist had taken. We also planned to ask the provider to meet at a later time to ensure the changes had taken place and were working. The consumer felt this was the best option and so the advocate wrote to the pharmacist advising the complaint was closed.  However the consumer with his advocate would like to meet in a few months time to discuss the improvements made.

Follow-up action on the resolution agreement:

Three months later the advocate accompanied the consumer to a meeting with the provider to discuss the changes. The provider provided copies of policies that had been changed. He also provided a personal apology and thanked the consumer for the feedback. The pharmacist advised that the matter had been taken to the Pharmacy Council for review.

The provider was also able to provide assurance to the consumer that his concerns were treated seriously and that the changes had certainly improved services.  It also highlighted staff performance issues that they were not previously aware of.

The consumer was satisfied following this meeting that his plan to  improve services and make changes to prevent the same thing from happening to anyone else had been achieved.

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Return to pharmacy

An elderly consumer contacted an advocate with a complaint about her local pharmacy. The pharmacy had recently come under new management and she felt that some staff were disrespectful in their manner towards her.

The consumer had recently been prescribed new medication by her GP and was apprehensive about returning to the pharmacy, but had no other option as it was the closest to her home. After discussing her options she thought that a phone call to the manager would be the best way to resolve her concerns. She did not feel she could do this herself and asked that the advocate ring to inform the manager of how she felt about returning.

The consumer returned to the store and felt that her concerns had been successfully dealt with. The manager invited the advocate to do some training with staff around the code. 

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